How to Write a Great Resume Summary With Examples

A resume summary is a concise summary of who you are and the value that you can bring to an organization. Today (2018), all strong resumes are expected to have resume summaries in place of the antiquated “Objective.” The resume summary is essentially your elevator speech, which is a very brief “commercial” of who you are and how you can benefit an organization.

What To Include

First, be certain to include a resume summary right after your contact information. Excluding a summary or just listing a few bullets about your qualifications (or worse listing an Objective) will nearly guarantee your resume gets passed unless you personally know the hiring manager. The resume summary is essentially a condensed version of the “Tell Me About Yourself Question.” When writing a summary, you want to ensure that you include relevant and specific information that showcases who you are without being too generic. A great summary will include who you are, what you’ve done, what value you bring, and what your strengths are. Also, you should always include your resume title above the resume summary to make it clear who you are (i.e. Sales Professional, IT Executive, Project Manager, etc.)

Keep It Short

You may have been in an industry for 20+ years and have done enough to fill 100+ pages of text; however, your summary shouldn’t be longer than five or six sentences. TheLadders (2017) conducted a study and showed that the average recruiter spends 6-seconds reviewing a resume, so your resume summary should be concise and compelling. You need to quickly capture the hiring managers attention and highlight your top-selling points or unique value proposition. Avoid being redundant and including too many generic sentences that can apply to anyone.

Three Great Resume Summary Examples:

Example #1 – Global Vice Chairman

Results-driven global executive with a proven track record of successfully building and leading communications businesses in North America, Asia-Pacific, Europe, and Latin America. Expertise in corporate trust and reputation, operational leadership, business development, strategic planning, and streamlining operations to significantly increase revenue and profitability. Highly regarded commentator on issues of corporate trust, crisis, and corporate reputation for CNN, Bloomberg, CNBC, the BBC, and Channel News Asia in addition to delivering insights for print, trade, and other broadcast media on five continents. Presenter at the United Nations Global Compact Leaders Conference, the Clinton Global Initiative, The World Economic Forum’s Anti-Corruption Conference, FSG’s Shared Value Conference, and countless industry and client events.

Example #2 – Senior Sales Executive

Award-winning sales executive with vast experience in global sales/marketing and financial management. Expertise in sourcing and retaining new business as the deal lead and providing the framework for completing KYC due diligence for specialized clients. Demonstrated history of generating more than $100+ million in wins and bookings. Successful client-relations manager who understands client needs, manages expectations, builds lasting relationships, instills trust, and ensures the delivery of integrated solutions. Highly adept working in the FinTech industry.

Example #3 – Technical Director

Highly talented IT executive with a demonstrated track record of designing, building, and rolling out multi-million-dollar strategic, tactical IT, and operational solutions that significantly contributes to organizational performance. Oversaw the build-out of 450+ retail stores from a technology perspective including hardware, software, LAN/WAN, and telephony along with managing 350+ projects’ lifecycles from inception to rollout. Expertise in effectively leading teams, instilling passion, and developing people to achieve excellence. Strong ability to communicate with both technical and non-technical audiences.

All three of these examples clearly exemplify who the candidate is, what the candidate has done, what value the candidate brings, and what the candidates strengths are in a concise and compelling manner without unnecessary fluff. Fluff is a resume summary that’s filled with generic sentences like the example below:

Example #4 – Generic Fluff Summary

Energetic and creative professional with a cross-functional background in operations. History of working well with all levels of leadership and developing effective relationships. Strong ability to make immediate and valuable contributions to an organization. Flexible and open-minded with an outstanding ability to adapt to any situation. Excellent research, strategic thinking, communication, and presentation skills.

Conclusion

Think of your resume summary as the only thing a hiring manager will read, because in many cases it just may be. Your resume summary is your elevator pitch and should include who you are, what you’ve done, what value you bring, and what your strengths are in a concise and compelling manner. Remember to include your title above your summary to immediately identify who you are. You can use a generic “Professional Summary” or “Qualifications” if you have a very diverse background and it’s difficult to define who you are in a single title. Always remember to include a resume summary as candidates without one will surely be passed.

Step By Step Guide To Stop Feeling Insecure In Relationships

In order to learn how to reduce insecurity, you must first begin to understand your self esteem. Self belief, begins early in life. Low self esteem is the product of your upbringing and life experiences and manifests in loss of trust, self worth and self confidence.

Feelings of insecurity are learnt along our journey when you (incorrectly) learn through negative experiences to connect negative events to being rejected.

For instance, as a child, you learn to feel insecure if you are brought up with caregivers engaging in inconsistent parenting. This happens when your parents’ or guardians’ disciplines in an inconsistent manner. This inconsistency results from parenting being mood dependent, rather than consistently being based on particular rules, norms or expectations.

At school this inconsistency is highlighted on a regular basis amongst friendships. Children are going through so many hormonal and emotional changes at school, that emotional reactions and hurt feelings occur daily, if not weekly. If you were taught to perceive these changes as simply emotional and not personal, your self esteem would stay in tact. However, often children internalise these daily rejections to mean they are not liked or unwanted. Even after children make-up (which also happens daily), they can be left with the scars of potential rejection. Children then learn early how to ‘walk on eggshells’ to avoid being rejected again.

Examples of how self doubt can manifest are as follows:

– A close friend gets angry any time you have to say “no” to doing something with her, regardless of your reason
– Your partner yells at you every time he is overtired or stressed out
– A mother in your mothers group argues against every opinion you have about parenting
– Someone close to you ignores you when you are in a group
– Your x-partner cheats on you, so you become paranoid every partner will cheat on you in the future

Reducing self doubt and worry with significant people in your life

The above points highlight negative behaviours that can lead to the development of fear of rejection. Each of these examples highlights other people’s behaviours, which were internalised incorrectly as self-blame. However, this internalisation was incorrect. The examples above would best have been internalised as external responses resulting from the other person’s personal issues. Let’s quickly dissect each example:

A close friend gets angry
This is a reflection of your friend’s issues and has nothing to do with your behaviour. You have a right to say “no” when you are busy too

Your partner yells at you
His/her moods are dictating his reactions towards you. His moods are the issue, not your behaviours

A mother in your mothers group argues against you
This is a reflection of the mother either feeling intimidated by your opinions, or insecure about your role within the group. You have a right to have a different opinion to hers

Your close friend ignores you in a group
This is either an oversight, or the other person is overcompensating for their own insecurities, or jealousy, by focussing on those who may need more work to become close friends or family

Your x-partner cheats on you
This is a reflection of your x-partner and has no bearing on you. Regardless of anything occurring within the relationship, cheating is only the fault of the person engaging in the behaviour

The Top 5 Answers To Reduce Anxiety With Your Partner

1. Rebuilding your self esteem to ensure you have the strength to cope when things go wrong and to be resilient to negative experiences

2. Questioning honestly whether someone’s behaviour is a reflection of their issues (not yours)

3. Trusting in yourself and in your instincts

4. Being open and honest with those you care about to express how you’re feeling and question inappropriate behaviour

5. Living in the world of facts, not perception. So you only act on your concerns when you are 100% confident your judgement is accurate (e.g. ask if necessary before you act).

The most important thing is to believe that insecurity is not a healthy emotion and leads to negative and destructive behaviours. It’s not your fault that you feel this way, but as an adult you have the choice of either continuing to feed this, or challenging it and overcoming in. In doing the latter you will enrich your relationships, enhance your career and live a much more healthy, happy and successful life.

The Agwagwa Festival: A Ghanaian Traditional Cultural Event for Unearthing Young Talents

The Agwagwa Festival is commemorated by the people of Kwahu Obemeng in the Eastern Region of Ghana. It has a long celebration record of hundred and twenty-five years! The whole concept of the event originated from the ingenuity of their early forebears to improvise a pushcart that could travel within the spaces in cocoa farms, transporting coca farmers from one spot to the other in their farms. It was also used by the young ones as a medium for entertainment while riding them after a stressful farming day. The name of the festival ‘Agwagwa’ was gotten from the sound of the traditional improvised pushcart when it was moved.

The improvised pushcart device was traditionally produced from the big and hard seeds of the local plant called Gyatofoa tree which was very common in the territories of Kwahu Obemeng in the Eastern Region of Ghana. Long flat beams were laid on the big hard seeds from the tree that served as tyres for the moving pushcart. When it was sat on, it was pulled manually from the back by others. It could move from top mountains and hills while landing on lower shores. Today, due to advancement in technology, ball bearings that have been well cushioned are used as tyres for the pushcart. Interestingly, the youth in the society has been given the liberty to experiment and provide interesting moving pushcarts with diverse designs and with any materials that they could lay their hands on. This has developed into an annual youth competition whenever the Agwagwa festival is commemorated during the first month of every year.

The annual competition has been an avenue for finding talented, creative and brilliant young members in the Eastern Region of Ghana who may not have received any form of formal education as a result of their impoverished state. The festival helps in bringing these genius young ones into the public spotlight so that well-meaning members of the society, philanthropists, funding agencies and youth aid agencies could come to their aid. Many fortunate talented youngsters have gotten such privileges and as such, have had access to formal education to hone their great skills and talents. The excellent and unique designs of the pushcarts produced by the young ones could be further developed into very interesting transportation machines. The festival is a traditional event for grooming young persons who would have wasted their talents because of poverty. Due to the festival, many of such youngsters can now have their wish fulfilled as they become future engineers and product designers for leading engineering firms.

The Agwagwa traditional festival receives very little support from funding agencies and companies. This is because it is not known by many people and agencies due to the poor advertisement and public sensitization. Therefore, the tourism industry, youth development initiatives and groups, funding agencies and well-meaning individuals must seek for ways of supporting the chief and traditional council of Kwahu Obemeng as they effectively plan and celebrate the festival. This all-important support and collaboration would help in using the festival in serving its core function which is to search for young talents and assist them to be great engineers and designers for national and global development.

3 Steps To A Happy Relationship

I’ve spent a great deal of time working with couples who are having a hard time communicating within their relationship. One of the first questions I ask them is “Was it always hard to talk to each other”? The answer is almost always no. But over time, the inability to connect through verbal communication has faded. It is interesting to note, that I see this more in couples who are younger than 40. I believe this to be true because this demographic grew up with a mobile device attached to their hips and hands, and never really had to rely on basic interpersonal skills. And there are 3 areas that commonly cause problems for us as we try to communicate.

The first problem area is courtesy. Courtesy and basic politeness are in many cases are non-existent in my younger couples. While this can be true at any age, the art of courtesy is lacking with the 40 and younger crowd (please know that I am not making a generalization. I just see it more with these couples).

I have written about this extensively. When engaged in mindful conversation with our partner, we don’t answer text, emails or take calls. I know I am guilty of this from time to time. But both my wife and I are very good at communicating our needs when having these conversations. Just the other night as we were driving down to the water, I started to talk about our upcoming financial responsibilities. In a matter of seconds, she asked if we could please not talk about that now. That the point of going to the water was to enjoy the sunset and wildlife. In a matter of seconds, that conversation stopped, and we were able to enjoy our evening talking about more meaningful things.

By showing her respect and honoring her wishes, we were able to connect to each other and source. She stated her request. She wasn’t rude about it. I didn’t take offense to it. We had a lovely evening. Politeness paved the way.

The second area that brings couples do my door is their fighting. When two or more are gathered together, there will eventually be misunderstanding and conflict. However, if you “fight fair”, it can be a door that leads to greater intimacy. Let me try and simplify this. See the above section on courtesy and politeness. It is so important that when a difficult conversation starts, be fully present and invest in the process.

I have had couples when in the middle of a heated discussion take calls, turn of the TV set and any other thing they could do to avoid intimacy. Because that what this really boils down to. Being vulnerable and resistant to change. There are many tools out there that can help facilitate an argument. It would be helpful to research some, and have them readily available (and agreed upon) prior to a fight. It is much better to be proactive than reactive in these situations.

The last thing I want to mention is the “I’m sorry” area. So many of us have outgrown an apology. We either don’t say it. Or, we don’t mean it. You know the old saying that the best apology is changed behavior. But even before we get to that point, it starts from those words rolling off of our lips. I am sorry. And know that not every apology is an admission to guilt. You can be sorry that someone is hurting. You can be sorry that someone misunderstood what you said. The important this is say it. Give clarifications. Make adjustments. Be open. Be vulnerable and move on. It’s quite the simple process.

If you follow these 3 steps, you should be well on your way to a greater level of communication and intimacy in your relationship. When you’re polite, you will usually be met with kindness in return. If you have tools that are agreeable to the both of you prior to a heated discussion, you probably decreased the intensity by at least a third. And it’s okay to say I’m sorry and be vulnerable. If we remain closed off, the best we can expect is a relationship of little progress and superficial communication. And if you’re still reading this. I’m guessing you want more from your relationship.

Postmodern Film Approach: CBC’s Othello

If I understand Othello correctly the viewer is supposed to be enveloped in a sense of suffocation, a feeling of being smothered, as Iago’s box closes around the others, capturing them. That doesn’t happen in this production at all, and one of the reasons it doesn’t is that the production is so beautiful. The sets, the costumes, the cinematography, all of it – it’s excellent, even breathtaking, to the point of distraction. (Compare the sense of asphyxiation in Trevor Nunn’s film with Ian McKellen and Willard White and the BBC film with Bob Hoskins and Anthony Hopkins – in those we feel really choked.)

I’m a firm believer that the “style over substance” type of aesthetic can go a long way, and justify a lot, but it usually can’t go all the way and justify everything. The true stars of this production are the costume designer Debra Hanson; the cinematographer Glen Keenan; the production designer Callum Maclachlan; and even the composer of the haunting theme, Philip J. Bennett. So – what of everything else?

I understand the necessity of time limitations in a television adaptation of Shakespeare, and I understand Orson Welles edited this work enormously also, but that isn’t justification. Chopping this play to two hours from its true three and a half is too much. It turns the play into Shakespeare for adolescents. Too many key speeches and scenes have to go. In particular the bawdy jesting between Iago and Desdemona as they leave the ship cannot be hacked off, as it gives too much insight into both of those critical characters. The cuts hurt.

Too: showing the corpses at the very start, and then flashing back, is a mistake. (It was a mistake when Welles did it as well; it will always be a mistake.) I can’t get behind this kind of re-writing of Shakespeare in any way, shape, or form. And this isn’t the only way Zaib Shaikh re-writes. He gives Roderigo the line “… this Muslim” (meaning Othello) at one point, which Shakespeare certainly didn’t write. The point is reinforced by having Othello exchange his necklace (a star and crescent) with Desdemona for hers (a cross) at the beginning, when they’re married. I don’t see anything wrong with the visual message of the necklaces, but again, re-writing the Bard, putting in words he didn’t write? A no no! Show, don’t tell.

The camera here is relatively bland. What about the acting? Christine Horne as Desdemona and Peter Donaldson as her father are sensational; I’ve not seen earnest, wholesome goodness just ooze out of Desdemona like this before. In the thankless role of Bianca Nazneen Contractor isn’t bad, and Ryan Hollyman looks like a great Roderigo. No one else is a Shakespearean heavyweight, to say the least. Compare Frank Finlay’s “Are you mad?” in the final scene to Matthew DeSlippe’s here and you’ll know most of what you need to know.